Wheels Information


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Wheel Size  |  Bolt Pattern  |  Offset  |  Bore  |  Lip Size  |  Back Spacing  |  Load Rating  |  Wheel Types

Wheel Breakdown

Not clear on what the parts of a wheel are? Check out the diagram to break it down.

Wheel Size

Wheel size is made up of the wheel diameter and wheel width.

Wheel Diameter: To get the wheel diameter, measure across the face of the wheel from bead seat to bead seat.

Wheel Width: To get the wheel width measure across the barrel of wheel from bead seat to bead seat.

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Bolt Pattern

Wheels contain holes in the center. The largest (in the direct center) is the bore. The smaller holes (surrounding the bore) are the lug holes. These are the mechanical attachment point for the wheel to the vehicle. The lug holes are organized in a circular pattern called the bolt pattern. Bolt patterns come in 4-lug, 5-lug, 6-lug, 8-lug and dual. The first number refers to the number of lug holes are on the wheel. The second number describes the diameter of the circle the holes make. As an example, a wheel with a 6x127 bolt pattern has 6 lug holes that are equally spaced on a 127mm circle.

**Vehicles will only accept wheels with the same bolt pattern as the original equipment wheel**

4 Lug

For a 4-lug wheel, the pattern is measured in a straight line from center to center of two bolts that are directly across from each other.

5 Lug

For a 5-lug wheel, the pattern is measured by using a straight line from the backside of one hole to the center of the third hole.

6 Lug

6-lug patterns are measured in a straight line from center to center of two bolts that are directly across from each other.

8 Lug

8-lug patterns are measured in a straight line from center to center of two bolts that are directly across from each other.






Along with the 4-lug, 5-lug, 6-lug and 8-lug bolt patterns, there is the dual bolt pattern. If a wheel has a dual bolt pattern it will have two different sets of lug holes. This enables the wheel to accept two different bolt patterns, allowing it to fit more models of vehicles.







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Offset

Offset is in reference to the wheel's idea placement, creating a freely rotating wheel without rubbing brakes and fenders. To get the wheel's offset, measure the distance (in millimeters) between the centerline and the mounting surface. The wheel's offset is either positive, zero or negative.

Positive Offset

The mounting surface of the wheel extends past the wheel's centerline. The mounting surface ends up closer to the face of the wheel.


Zero Offset

The mounting surface of the wheel is centered within the rim, aligned with the wheel's centerline.



Negative Offset

The mounting surface of the wheel sits before the wheel's centerline. The mounting surface ends up closer to the back of the wheel and closer to the vehicle's suspension.






























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Bore

The center bore (hub bore) is the opening in the center of the wheel that allows for the wheel to fit on the axle. This is the part of the wheel bears the weight vehicle. You must ensure the bore is at least the size of the OEM associated with your vehicle. If the bore of the new wheel is larger in size, hub centric rings can be used to fill the gap. Center caps are placed over bore to give the wheel a clean look and complete the style of the wheel.

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Lip Size

The wheel lip extends past the wheel bead seat. Wheel lip sizes can range from rather large to no lip at all.

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Backspacing

Backspacing is a measurement of how deep the mounting pad is located in the wheel. Having correct backspacing allows for sufficient room for brake, steering and suspension systems to work without interfering with the wheel. Wheels with positive offset creates more backspace and wheels with negative offset creates less backspace.

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Load Rating

The load rating for a wheel is determined and supplied by the wheel manufacturer and should not be exceeded. You can find the load rating for your vehicle by checking your vehicle's identification label usually located on the gas tank door, truck, glove box or driver's side door jamb. The load rating for your vehicle can be figured out by dividing the vehicle's heaviest gross axle weight rating by two.

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